Solar Development Agreement

Solar contracts are well suited to small and medium-medium grid-coupled photovoltaic projects. Standardised contracts include: Power Purchase Agreement, Implementation Contract, O&M Contract, Delivery Contract, Installation Contract and Term Sheet on the Financing Facility. These are complemented by the implementation guidelines. The design and construction of solar power generation facilities is an area filled with risks and opportunities. The objective of this chapter is to take stock of the legal issues that arise in the context of the engineering and construction of solar energy projects, in order to identify the main risk allocations often used in this sector to create the legal framework for a successful solar energy project. II. Design and Engineering Services. Solar power projects require a certain amount of design and engineering know-how, unique in this sector of the power generation industry. Designers and engineers must coordinate their services with the structural and electrical planners and engineers who work on the structure to ensure proper integration and planning.

In the past, relatively few companies have designed, built and produced solar power generation facilities, photovoltaic or thin-film modules, or thermal and concentrated solar installations. Today, there are a number of manufacturers in each of these areas. A. Project financing. A solar project owner/developer often needs some form of borrowing or equity to pay for the initial design, engineering, acquisition, construction and operation of the project. Financial institutions and potential investors will request the opportunity to verify and comment on a project`s design and EPC agreements (as well as related operation, maintenance and warranty agreements, if not separately) before committing funds. The provisions of the agreements that give the lender or investor the opportunity to take over the project in case of delay of the owner/developer (the borrower) and the provisions defining the extent and nature of the damages available to a project owner/developer for the late conclusion or failure of the project are of particular interest to lenders and potential investors; to produce expected amounts of electricity. . . . .